Jump to content

GoBigBlack

Members
  • Posts

    918
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Recent Profile Visitors

404 profile views

GoBigBlack's Achievements

Experienced

Experienced (11/14)

  • One Year In
  • Posting Machine
  • Conversation Starter
  • Very Popular
  • One Month Later

Recent Badges

426

Reputation

  1. On a Tuesday afternoon. That can easily be a 10-hour drive on any given Friday. Much easier for BG going against traffic.
  2. Yeah that’s entirely possible. I’m far from an expert on homelessness and I’m using things HUD wouldn’t as my reasoning. It’s not an uneducated guess, but a guess nonetheless. I’m fine being wrong sometimes. But I don’t think I’m in disagreement with HUD. I think I said my opinion is it was artificially low. If I misstated it before, that’s my opinion. And yeah, can’t get by in life without 30 pairs of Jordans. “New boat” was meant as an all-encompassing term covering a multitude of products people buy but never should and can’t afford. Those who have saved and been responsible should be coming up on a lot of good opportunities in the near future.
  3. Sure it is. It also grew disproportionately (low) compared to population growth the last two years. I think that number is artificially low and anything coming out anytime soon will be artificially high. I also think we’ll have to be a few years removed from anything pandemic related before we get an accurate picture of a lot of things. Also, the average American put themselves in a bad situation. Have you seen the savings rates during the pandemic along with post-pandemic credit utilization and spending? $1 trillion of pandemic savings spent. And before you say “price of eggs,” look at luxury goods spending. It’s ludicrous. If we have a recession one of the factors triggering it will be that people don’t have money left to spend. Their paychecks are going toward their new boats.
  4. Maybe you missed it, but no, I don’t. I said this in response to you regarding foreclosure rates — And I have zero doubts about homelessness increasing as long as the population continues to do so.
  5. I disagree with what they said and I’m betting they’re more likely overstated this year, specifically. But there are a number of factors at play that could drastically influence it in either direction. I’m not trying to split hairs here, the entire point is that the outrage isn’t rooted in reality. So at this point he’s pissed because homelessness might be increasing and more people might be foreclosed on. But he can’t really know for sure. Better to err on the side of caution and let those emotions rip, I suppose.
  6. No idea if it's an indicator. As things return to normal after COVID and people start frequenting parks, downtown areas, etc.. the homeless camps have been shut down. It's not a shock that the shelters get overwhelmed, and I would bet that's the single biggest factor. I'd say we can't really conclude anything from the article. That's definitely going to increase. A lot of folks who bought homes with adjustable rates during COVID trying to catch the housing wave or be the next to retire with an Air B&B business are about to see those rates jump. A lot of people are going to get whacked. Hard. I don't know how much impact that has on the numbers. Don't have time to read it all, but I will. Here's an excerpt from that article -- “Eighteen months after the end of the government’s foreclosure moratorium, and with less than five percent of the 8.4 million borrowers who entered the CARES Act forbearance program remaining, foreclosure activity remains significantly lower than it was prior to the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Rick Sharga, executive vice president of market intelligence at ATTOM. “It seems clear that government and mortgage industry efforts during the pandemic, coupled with a strong economy, have helped prevent millions of unnecessary foreclosures.” The general point is still true in the sense that some Americans always have and always will lose their homes. Outside of that, it's crocodile tears coming from a purely partisan place. I don't disagree that it's outrageous. But, as our good friend Paul Ryan will tell you, these citizens who could use a hand just need to use that hand to pull themselves up by their bootstraps. I'll read the article later, thanks for the info sharing.
  7. If they calculated January in December or December in December it's an apples to apples comparison. I'm assuming they don't change the way they calculate.
  8. Thanks for enlightening us, Master Yoda.
  9. No, they’re not from over a year ago. My numbers are from HUD, and they’re from December 2022. Just 4 weeks ago. And if you annualized it, you’re looking at closer to 0.15% increases, aren’t you now? 0.3% was a two-year figure. A decrease in 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016. Then something changed and as you noted it began trending up in 2017. I read there was no 2020 study but the chart suggests there was. Regardless, the increase from 2020 to 2022, a full two years later, was less than the previous two single-year increases on record… by a lot.
  10. That still doesn’t address the slower growth in rate of homelessness nationwide over the last three years or the fact that fewer people are having homes foreclosed on today than under Trump in 2019 before COVID. Those are the points I made and if you have something to share that would suggest otherwise then I’m all ears. Otherwise, your charts don’t really have much to do with the chief, unfounded complaints made by the OP here or by me in my responses to him.
  11. Wisdom on what? I’m still trying to figure out who indoctrinated me. Was it the conservative Catholic schools I went to my whole life in conservative Orange County? Was it the conservative university I attended? Was it the conservative military I served in? Or the conservative businessmen who stacked our company with conservative former and active congressmen, governors, retired generals, and any other slime ball they could squeeze a penny out of? You have it twisted. I’m not some pink-haired sky screaming liberal, I just have a strong disdain, to put it mildly, for the conservative movement happening today. More than likely a result of spending the overwhelming majority of my life surrounded by them. You do project hard as fuck, though. It’s almost impressive.
  12. That doesn’t address a single thing in my response. Is that chart tracking homeless people in NY? Dallas? Rome? London? Again, I’m talking all homeless people in the United States, and that number is close to 600,000. So you’re going to have to expound here if this chart is supposed to mean something. Whatever the chart tracks, it was trending down until 2017, then started trending up. Which also doesn’t support any case the OP was making.
  13. Based on how you conduct yourself, if your moral compass is heading North then I’m making a mad dash due South. The University of Tennessee is not a premier university, and the dumbest person I went to grammar school with became a lawyer. A degree doesn’t make you smart. Case in point…
  14. Nope. I never said the first thing about who I believe the “experts” are. I never even said the word. That’s just you jumping to conclusions that don’t exist again because you lack the necessary information required to come to an accurate one, so you just assume the thing you want to be true is. P.S. That’s all.
  15. In NY? Sure, maybe. The national study I’m referencing wasn’t done in 2020 or 2021 due to COVID. So they’re comparing 2019 to 2022, and there was a nationwide increase of a whopping 2,000 homeless people, or 0.3%. I have no doubt you can find specific areas it’s gotten worse, but nationwide the numbers indicate it has not. So the logical conclusion is homeless people went to NYC more than other places during COVID, so the numbers from where they came should be down to compensate for the “spike” there. Is that the case?
×
×
  • Create New...