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7 minutes ago, DarterBlue said:

That works for tristate. But I don't get the rest of the country. It's not like housing markets have been very strong in the Southeast. Never really recovered from the collapse of the housing bubble. 

People moving like crazy from the tri state into the southeast have been for years 

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I found video of @DarterBlue  as a small child. 😂     

Today’s market action was significant. Based on the criteria I use, a buy (go long) signal was flashed loud and clear. Now to be precise, I am an intermediate term trader. I am looking to make money o

Well shit Darter, why didn’t you warn me not to buy penny stocks 

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Heading into Friday: The bulls staged a decent stand Thursday. But they only scored a draw. They did not turn the tide definitively. And, they should have. The market is oversold, badly so. In fact the last time we were this oversold, was early in the brief, but very scary bear market last February/March. As I type this, stock futures are mostly down. Only the NASDAQ futures are not. And they are not up, but are approximately breakeven. 

It should be a fascinating day. And it could be  consequential one. Should the market take out, decisively, the lows put in on Monday, then the last stand will have been breached. The next real area of support lies some 5-10% below current levels depending on the index evaluated. 

Of course, I am not a neutral observer. I am short the market. Therefore, you may wish to take my words with a grain of salt. But somehow, I think you know, in your heart of hearts, that this market is in real trouble ...

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1 minute ago, HSFBfan said:

Exactly. Let's see trump goes after 5g and now a fire hmmmmm makes u wonder 

I will reserve my judgment till there is more information out there. Will speak with my son about this to the extent he is comfortable doing so. 

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Just now, DarterBlue said:

I will reserve my judgment till there is more information out there. Will speak with my son about this to the extent he is comfortable doing so. 

I dont believe in coincidences. Too many global things happening coming to the forefront 

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Just now, HSFBfan said:

I dont believe in coincidences. Too many global things happening coming to the forefront 

There are more coincidences in life than most of us realize. Not saying it is, but not saying it is not. Being closer to the action than me TD's perspective should be interesting. 

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1 minute ago, DarterBlue said:

There are more coincidences in life than most of us realize. Not saying it is, but not saying it is not. Being closer to the action than me TD's perspective should be interesting. 

U can't have all these happening and be a coincidence 

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Stocks closed broadly higher, near day highs, but on lower volume. In the process, the NASDAQ closed just below its 50-day moving average while the NASDAQ 100 closed just above that mark. They were the only indices among the headline ones to do so. The others still languished below that mark. The gains ranged from .97% on the NYSE to 2.34% on the NASDAQ 100. While the NASDAQ indices led the way, stocks of all stripes participated. On the day, breadth was decent but not great as advancing stocks led by 2.3-1 on the NYSE and 2.85-1 on the NASDAQ. How do I view the day? Positive with some caveats. First the good aspects: 1. The rally was broad based. 2. Stocks closed very near day highs. 3. Breadth was solid. 4. The NASDAQ indices led the market higher. It is good when the market leaders take charge. Now the negatives: 1. Volume was missing. 2. None of the indices broke their downtrends, most still languish below their 50-day moving averages. My take is that while this was a decent rally attempt, the burden of proof still lies with the bulls.

On the day, I lost $5,518 or .89%. Despite this, I closed the week higher by $8,423 or about 1.4%. On the day my big winner was ZM which gained 6.78% or $31.52. In the process it regained almost all of Thursday’s losses. A negative was the fact that its volume was below its average daily volume. NEM was down 2 cents, for all intent and purposes flat. I fell out of bed because both my PUT positions got torpedoed due to the broad, based market gains. For now, I am still optimistic that these puts are going to work out in spades. The market faces some key technical tests early next week. How they respond to them will largely determine whether my puts were a great buy or a mistake. I will take my direction from the market as one goes broke fighting the tape. The key is to be in sync if you want to make money.

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8 minutes ago, HSFBfan said:

I have no idea. Was hoping you'd see me and tell me 

I know vanguard is a big name though 

Yes, Vanguard is a very big name. I also through very highly of John Bogle who, I believe, was its founder and for many years its head. I read the article and it seems they decided to close the two funds because NJ and Penn were not issuing short term debt anymore. But the article did not explain why. As I no longer live in that neck of the woods, I though you may have an idea why they had stopped doing this. My guess would be because long term debt has become so cheap (flattening of the yield curve), but that is only a guess. 

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4 minutes ago, DarterBlue said:

Yes, Vanguard is a very big name. I also through very highly of John Bogle who, I believe, was its founder and for many years its head. I read the article and it seems they decided to close the two funds because NJ and Penn were not issuing short term debt anymore. But the article did not explain why. As I no longer live in that neck of the woods, I though you may have an idea why they had stopped doing this. My guess would be because long term debt has become so cheap (flattening of the yield curve), but that is only a guess. 

I do not as I dont not follow these things that closely. I saw the name and saw they were closing in two major cities. It caught my eye 

It maybe a story that ill follow up on as the days go on and we get more information 

Check out the Fannie and Freddie article I posted above 

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24 minutes ago, HSFBfan said:

Vanguard closes Pa., N.J. municipal money market funds, will liquidate both in November

https://www.inquirer.com/news/vanguard-pennsylvania-new-jersey-municipa-money-market-funds-20200925.html?outputType=amp

 

22 minutes ago, HSFBfan said:

Fannie, Freddie pose risk to financial system, panel says in 'historic' finding

https://www.politico.com/amp/news/2020/09/25/fannie-mae-freddie-mac-financial-risk-421814

I work or used to work for vanguard, Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae doing foreclosure Cleanouts  

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25 minutes ago, HSFBfan said:

Check out the Fannie and Freddie article I posted above 

I did. Back in 2008 they were both bankrupt. The Republican dominated congress wanted to let them fail back in 2010/11. But somehow, they survive to this day. I will say this: For better or worse, and that depends on your political view of the housing market, without their survival, access to a mortgage loan would be severely constricted without them. That would lead to a significant reduction in the housing stock, as new homes would be unaffordable for many. 

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53 minutes ago, DarterBlue said:

 I read the article and it seems they decided to close the two funds because NJ and Penn were not issuing short term debt anymore. But the article did not explain why. As I no longer live in that neck of the woods, I though you may have an idea why they had stopped doing this. My guess would be because long term debt has become so cheap (flattening of the yield curve), but that is only a guess. 

 

"States, cities, and other municipal borrowers aren’t issuing short-term paper in large amounts, LaBas said, and instead are selling longer-term bonds. That way, he said, they can pay the current low interest rates over a longer period."

looks like some here are placing their bets on in some longer term inflationary outlook...🤔

would have to keep in mind just because NJ places a bet....doesn't always mean it's a good punt 🤷‍♂️

 

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1 minute ago, Troll said:

 

"States, cities, and other municipal borrowers aren’t issuing short-term paper in large amounts, LaBas said, and instead are selling longer-term bonds. That way, he said, they can pay the current low interest rates over a longer period."

looks like some here are placing their bets on in some longer term inflationary outlook...🤔

would have to keep in mind just because NJ places a bet....doesn't always mean it's a good punt 🤷‍♂️

 

The outlook concerning inflation is mixed. On the one hand, you have expansionary monetary and fiscal policy which should, ceteris paribus, be inflationary. But on the other hand, you have stagnant wages (a decades long trend), coupled with increased unemployment due to the Covid-19 lockdowns and public skepticism about returning to the "old normal." 

If we got inflation under the above circumstances, life would be very miserable for the lower echelons of the working classes fomenting further social unrest. 

To my way of thinking (you can take it or leave it), we walk a tightrope. Whether we fall off or not will depend on the skill of those in power. I am not sure these individuals would have been high up the recruiting list of PT Barnum. 

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47 minutes ago, DarterBlue said:

The outlook concerning inflation is mixed. On the one hand, you have expansionary monetary and fiscal policy which should, ceteris paribus, be inflationary. But on the other hand, you have stagnant wages (a decades long trend), coupled with increased unemployment due to the Covid-19 lockdowns and public skepticism about returning to the "old normal." 

If we got inflation under the above circumstances, life would be very miserable for the lower echelons of the working classes fomenting further social unrest. 

To my way of thinking (you can take it or leave it), we walk a tightrope. Whether we fall off or not will depend on the skill of those in power. I am not sure these individuals would have been high up the recruiting list of PT Barnum. 

You know that was just an "explanation" assumed by the articles author right ??? 🤔

How you going to sell short term paper....if you are planning on having short term cash flow issues ?

(like a customer that now prefers some 10-year car loan) 🙄

 

PS: Can't say for sure, was just going by the article....

 

 

 

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44 minutes ago, Troll said:

You know that was just an "explanation" assumed by the articles author right ??? 🤔

How you going to sell short term paper....if you are planning on having short term cash flow issues ?

(like a customer that now prefers some 10-year car loan) 🙄

 

PS: Can't say for sure, was just going by the article....

 

 

 

It's called going to the payday lender, a common southern solution. 

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