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@ChimpGrip Got ya covered bro...  

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7 hours ago, Cossacks said:

Dude is a sharper dresser than me 😂. And that mullet and the brown bag of Thunderbird. Dude just screams class.

That's more of a skullet than a mullet. Dude got his ripple and dressed to kill. 

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, ChimpGrip said:

closet space

What's below the space of the proposed safe location? Crawl space or basement underneath you can shore it up.

Slab may carry the load depending on pour, if it's a monolithic over engineered fill with a slab of 4" it may not handle that static pressure for long.

bgw

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3 hours ago, BUFORDGAWOLVES said:

What's below the space of the proposed safe location? Crawl space or basement underneath you can shore it up.

Slab may carry the load depending on pour, if it's a monolithic over engineered fill with a slab of 4" it may not handle that static pressure for long.

bgw

Just the slab, no basement or crawlspace. But damn it I don't know its specs. The safe could really sink through the floor over time?

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13 hours ago, Cossacks said:

That thing is awesome. But I’d just keep buying guns to fill it. I’m trying to go the other direction with my guns 😂.

Yeah I like this one because its extreme weight and has great fire protection too. 

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53 minutes ago, ChimpGrip said:

Just the slab, no basement or crawlspace. But damn it I don't know its specs. The safe could really sink through the floor over time?

Yep.... or just crush the aggregate slab. 
Depends on how fill under the slab was compacted

Id consult an engineer. 
 

bgw

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5 hours ago, ChimpGrip said:

Just the slab, no basement or crawlspace. But damn it I don't know its specs. The safe could really sink through the floor over time?

Your residential structural slab on grade probably is 3,000 psi, 4" thick with reinforcing steel at 18" o/c each way. Concrete that is designated as 3,000 pounds of pressure per square inch is commonly used for residential driveways, interior, and basement slabs. This concrete is not considered to be high strength but is poured to carry a compressive strength of 3,000 pounds of pressure per square inch after 28 days. Conventional concrete in general has a strength less than 7,000 pounds per square inch. Your going to be OK.

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29 minutes ago, Exocet 98 said:

Your residential structural slab on grade probably is 3,000 psi, 4" thick with reinforcing steel at 18" o/c each way. Concrete that is designated as 3,000 pounds of pressure per square inch is commonly used for residential driveways, interior, and basement slabs. This concrete is not considered to be high strength but is poured to carry a compressive strength of 3,000 pounds of pressure per square inch after 28 days. Conventional concrete in general has a strength less than 7,000 pounds per square inch. Your going to be OK.

Okay so I want to take down my load bearing wall and open up kitchen into dining room

 

how much is it to put a support beam in so I can take down wall

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1 hour ago, Exocet 98 said:

Your residential structural slab on grade probably is 3,000 psi, 4" thick with reinforcing steel at 18" o/c each way. Concrete that is designated as 3,000 pounds of pressure per square inch is commonly used for residential driveways, interior, and basement slabs. This concrete is not considered to be high strength but is poured to carry a compressive strength of 3,000 pounds of pressure per square inch after 28 days. Conventional concrete in general has a strength less than 7,000 pounds per square inch. Your going to be OK.

Not necessarily reinforced with steel. This is Texas we’re talking about, no rebar in Ga slabs either. 
 

The only load bearing is in the footers in exterior walls, that MIGHT be reinforced with rebar. 
 

This is residential, more than likely two story and a roof assembly. 
 

bgw

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