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DBP66
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42 minutes ago, concha said:

And there are tens of millions of asshats who will rush to the polls and vote for his sorry ass again.

 

Americans have lost an average of $4,200 in annual income since Biden took office: Study lays bare how gains under Trump have been wiped out - while crippling inflation has sent prices surging

  • Consumer prices have risen 12.7 percent since 2021, far outpacing wages
  • Experts at the Heritage Foundation believe this has cost Americans about $3,000 each in purchasing power
  • As the Fed pushes interest rates to a range of 3-3.25 percent, higher borrowing costs are squeezing Americans on mortgages, vehicle loans and credit cards
  • The $4,200 loss erases the $4,000 increase in annual earnings that occurred under the Trump administration 

 

and then the S.C. got involved and everything changed.....1/2 the country is pissed off...this election isn't "all about the economy"....you'll see Don.

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This is sickening...he gets caught red handed so what does he do??...he whips out his "race card" from his back pocket and throws it around.....and if a black guy did this??...LOL...the right would lose their minds...only desperate fools try and use the "race card" when all else fails....f*in SAD!

After declaring that he's 'not a terrorist' Trump uses North Carolina rally to vilify New York Attorney General Letitia James

Taiyler Simone Mitchell
Sat, September 24, 2022 at 3:12 AM
 
 
Trump
 
Donald Trump arrives at a Make America Great Again rally in Cape Girardeau, Missouri on November 5, 2018.JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images
  • Former President Donald Trump bashed the NY AG who filed a suit against him and his family business.

  • His remarks came at a Friday rally where he also lifted up his children, who were named in the suit.

  • Trump called Letitia James "racist" and said her actions were "gross prosecutorial misconduct."

At a Friday rally in Wilmington, North Carolina, former President Donald Trump took the time to lift up three of his children in response to a new fraud suit filed against him.

During the rally in support of GOP Senate candidate Rep. Ted Budd, Trump said he and his fellow MAGA Republicans are not "terrorists" and claimed President Joe Biden "is cognitively impaired and in no condition to lead our country, which may very well end up in World War III."

But Trump spent more time berating New York Attorney General Letitia James, who has filed a massive fraud lawsuit against the Trump Organization.

The James' office said "Trump falsely inflated his net worth by billions of dollars to further enrich himself and cheat the system" and "repeatedly and persistently manipulated the value of assets to induce banks to lend money to the Trump Organization."

The suit follows a three-year probe into Trump and his business dealings.

Trump on Friday called James "racist" — an accusation he's also made on multiple other occasions — and referred to her actions as "gross prosecutorial misconduct."

The attorney general is accusing him, his children, and the Trump Organization of years of financial fraud. The case is just one of many legal problems Trump faces, including the investigation into mishandled classified documents at Mar-a-Lago and the probe into the January 6 insurrection.

At the rally, Trump defended his children who were named in the suit, apparently reading off a teleprompter: "Ivanka, Ivanka is a very good person. Don Jr., he's a good person. Eric. Eric. These are good people."

He added: "This crazy radical leftist nutjob James should be going after the killers, the gangbangers, the drug dealers."

James' office did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.

 

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Reuters

Trump's path to stall documents probe narrows after legal setbacks

9579ad06e5ede6f3df616b0eef9a1d0d
 
Former U.S. President Trump holds a rally in Ohio
 
Luc Cohen and Sarah N. Lynch
Thu, September 22, 2022 at 5:09 PM
 
 

By Luc Cohen and Sarah N. Lynch

(Reuters) -Donald Trump's bid to impede a criminal investigation into his possession of documents taken from the White House has begun to unravel, legal experts said, after courtroom setbacks including doubts expressed by judges about the former U.S. president's claim that he declassified records seized at his Florida home.

Trump has experienced disappointments on multiple fronts this week as his lawyers try to slow down the Justice Department investigation that kicked into high gear with an Aug. 8 court-approved search of his Mar-a-Lago residence in which FBI agents found 11,000 documents including about 100 marked as classified.

A three-judge panel of the Atlanta-based 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Wednesday ruled that federal investigators could immediately resume examining the classified records, reversing Florida-based U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon's decision to wall off these documents while an independent arbiter assesses whether any should be withheld as privileged.

 

"Cannon's ruling is so far out of the norm, and the 11th Circuit did such a good job of thoroughly dismantling her opinion," said Jonathan Shaub, a former attorney in the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel who now teaches law at the University of Kentucky.

Trump may appeal the 11th Circuit's ruling to the Supreme Court, but experts doubted the justices would agree to hear it. The 11th Circuit's panel included two judges appointed by Trump.

At issue in the investigation - one of several legal woes entangling Trump as he considers another run for the presidency in 2024 - is whether he broke federal laws preventing the destruction or concealment of government records and the unauthorized possession of national defense information. The Justice Department is also looking into whether Trump unlawfully tried to obstruct the investigation.

Trump has not been charged with any crime and the mere existence of an investigation does not mean he will be.

As part of Trump's counterattack against the investigation, he has made public claims that he personally declassified the seized records.

"If you're the president of the United States, you can declassify just by saying it's declassified, even by thinking it," Trump told Fox News on Wednesday. "You're sending it to Mar-a-Lago or wherever you're sending it, and there doesn't have to be a process."

Trump's lawyers, however, have stopped short of stating in court that he declassified the documents, though they have not conceded that they are classified.

The 11th Circuit called Trump's declassification argument a "red herring." The three statutes underpinning the FBI's search warrant at Mar-a-Lago make it a crime to mishandle government records, regardless of their classification status. The 11th Circuit also said it could not discern why Trump would have "an individual interest in or need" for any of the documents marked as classified.

Trump's lawyers did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

'REAL EVIDENCE'

To make matters worse for Trump, Judge Raymond Dearie - the arbiter, or special master, named by Cannon to vet the seized documents - asked Trump's lawyers on Tuesday why he should not consider records marked classified as genuinely classified. Dearie pressed Trump's lawyers to make clear whether they plan to assert that the records had been declassified as Trump claims.

Trump's lawyers proposed Dearie to serve as special master.

"Unless Trump can come up with real evidence saying he went through some kind of declassification procedure and declassified this stuff, there's no way he can prevail on this, and if he had that evidence his lawyers would have presented it," said Ilya Somin, a law professor at George Mason University.

Even as he has stated that he declassified the records, Trump also has publicly suggested that the FBI planted them at Mar-a-Lago. Dearie on Thursday asked Trump's lawyers to provide any evidence backing this up.

David Laufman, the Justice Department's former head of counterintelligence, said Trump's comments on Fox News were highly incriminating.

"Prosecutors must lick their chops every time Trump makes a public statement that is equivalent to making evidentiary admissions, like talking about sending documents marked classified down to Mar-a-Lago because, according to his account, he thought about declassifying them," Laufman said.

"It was a great day for the rule of law," Barbara McQuade, a former federal prosecutor and current law professor at the University of Michigan, said of the 11th Circuit's ruling. "It says that the law matters more than anyone's loyalty to a particular person."

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The cult is stronger than ever.....

Donald Trump shares Truth Social photo proclaiming him as second only to Jesus

Joshua Zitser
Sat, September 24, 2022 at 5:13 AM
 
 
Donald Trump and Jesus
 
Former President Donald Trump, left, speakING in North Carolina and an oil painting of Jesus, right, by Paris Bordone.Getty Images
  • Donald Trump shared a Truth Social post comparing him to Jesus Christ.

  • The post said the former president is "second greatest" only to Jesus.

  • Trump's supporters, and even Trump himself, have made similar comparisons before.

Former President Donald Trump shared a post on his Truth Social account on Friday, declaring him as "second" only to Jesus.

The post by Truth Social user @austinnegrete said: "Jesus is the Greatest. President @realDonaldTrump is the second greatest."

It accompanied an image of a painting of Jesus by artist Dan Wilson.

Trump "ReTruthed," or reposted, the Jesus comparison to his 4.1 million Truth Social followers.

It isn't the first time that the former president's supporters have compared him to Jesus.

In 2019, Georgia Rep. Barry Loudermilk claimed Jesus was treated more fairly before his crucifixion than Trump was treated throughout his first impeachment.

"When Jesus was falsely accused of treason, Pontius Pilate gave Jesus the opportunity to face his accusers," said Loudermilk during a debate on the House floor, per TIME magazine. "During that sham trial, Pontius Pilate afforded more rights to Jesus than the Democrats have afforded this President in this process."

In the same year, The Washington Post reported that white, conservative evangelicals who approved of Trump's performance as president promoted the idea that he was heaven-sent.

trump on stage with religious leaders
 
Local religious leaders pray alongside President Donald Trump during an "Evangelicals for Trump" rally in Miami, FL on Friday, Jan. 3, 2020.Photo by Scott McIntyre/For The Washington Post via Getty Images

Trump has made these grand proclamations himself. In August 2019, Trump told reporters in reference to trade with China: "I am the chosen one." He also shared tweets describing him as the "King of Israel" and "the second coming of God."

And in October 2020, per the Independent, he claimed to have had a conversation where somebody told him he was the most famous person in the world. Trump told his supporters in North Carolina that Jesus Christ was actually more famous than him.

Insider contacted Trump's post-presidency office for comment on Saturday morning but did not immediately receive a response.

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Trump Rally Staffers Reportedly Tell People To Drop One-Finger QAnon Salute

Mary Papenfuss
Sat, September 24, 2022 at 2:35 AM
 
 

Staff members at Donald Trump’s North Carolina political rally Friday night told members of the audience to drop their controversial QAnon one-finger salute, a journalist for NPR reported.

Those attending Trump’s rally in Youngstown, Ohio, last week sparked a controversy after many raised their arms pointing skyward in a gesture chillingly evocative of the stiff-armed “heil Hitler” salute honoring the late Nazi leader.

Donald Trump disciples raise a disturbing stiff-armed one-finger salute to the former president at his his Ohio rally last week. (Photo: Gaelen Morse via Reuters)
 
Donald Trump disciples raise a disturbing stiff-armed one-finger salute to the former president at his his Ohio rally last week. (Photo: Gaelen Morse via Reuters)

Donald Trump disciples raise a disturbing stiff-armed one-finger salute to the former president at his his Ohio rally last week. (Photo: Gaelen Morse via Reuters)

Hillary Clinton on Friday slammed the Ohio rally, comparing it to past Nazi gatherings in Germany, and Trump to Hitler.

“You saw the rally in Ohio the other night: Trump is there ranting and raving for more than an hour, and you have these rows of young men with their arms raised,” she said at the Texas Tribune Festival in Austin.

The comparisons may also have been worrisome for the Trump rally organizers in North Caroline because one man in the crowd at Wilmington told NPR’s Lisa Desjardins that a rally staffer told him to put his hand down when he raised the one-finger salute.

Other staff members could be seen telling others in the crowd the same, according to Desjardins. “Clearly,” they “had been directed to watch for this kind of gesture and to shut it down,” she tweeted.

Those attending the rally said the index-finger gesture stands for the QAnon sign WWG1WGA, or: “Where We Go One We Go All.”

But there were plenty of other conservative signifiers, such as Trump’s rally songs “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” and Elvis Presley singing “Dixie.”

The former president also flashed from the stage an “OK” sign, a gesture often used to communicate white supremacy and frequently employed by QAnon disciples.

In addition, Trump closed his lengthy speech over instrumental music linked to the QAnon movement similar to what was played during a segment of his speech in Ohio, the Raleigh News & Observer noted.

Trump promoted local candidates he has endorsed, and took the opportunity to bash investigations into his political and business practices.

He repeatedly attacked New York Attorney General Letitia James, bizarrely referring to her as “Peekaboo” several times, and calling her “disgusting,” “racist” and a “raging maniac” for investigating his business. A lawsuit (which Trump referred to as “depraved”) filed by her office earlier this week accuses Trump and his three oldest children of vastly misrepresenting the value of their assets to obtain loans and favorable insurance payouts, and undercut taxes.

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The New York Times

Trump Is Battling a New York Law Used to Take on Corporate Giants

 
 
Ben Protess, William K. Rashbaum and Rebecca Davis O'Brien
Sat, September 24, 2022 at 10:15 AM
 
 
Former President Donald Trump leaves Trump Tower in New York, Aug. 10, 2022. (Brittainy Newman/The New York Times)
 
Former President Donald Trump leaves Trump Tower in New York, Aug. 10, 2022. (Brittainy Newman/The New York Times)

For decades, the New York attorney general’s office has relied on a little known but powerful law to take on what it sees as the most egregious corporate malefactors, including oil producers, big banks, tobacco companies and Martin Shkreli. Now this dubious club has a new member: Donald Trump.

The attorney general, Letitia James, sued the former president, his family business and three of his children Wednesday, accusing them of lying to lenders and insurers by fraudulently and extravagantly overvaluing his assets — to the tune of billions of dollars.

Like thousands of earlier actions by the attorney general’s office — including those against oil giant Exxon Mobil, global bank UBS, tobacco company Juul, and Shkreli and his former pharmaceutical company — James’ lawsuit against the Trumps hinges on a muscular law that provides her office with an upper hand when investigating and punishing corporate wrongdoing.

 

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The law, enacted nearly 70 years ago when Jacob K. Javits was New York’s attorney general, has become a mainstay of the office. It has been central to a wide range of recent civil actions that have reaped hundreds of millions of dollars in settlements.

James’ lawsuit is not Trump’s first run-in with this particular statute; her predecessors employed it in legal actions against his for-profit education venture, Trump University, and his family charity, the Trump Foundation, both of which paid millions of dollars to resolve the cases. (The foundation was also dissolved).

Trump has denied all wrongdoing in the latest case and accused James, a Democrat running for reelection, of carrying out a politically motivated “witch hunt.” Trump’s claim that the inquiry was driven by politics was the subject of a countersuit that was thrown out by two judges this year.

The statute, known as Executive Law 63 (12), sounds more like an arcane ordinance than a powerful cudgel against corporate malfeasance. And yet, it provides the attorney general with an unusually broad legal arsenal to investigate businesses and people involved in “persistent fraud or illegality.”

At a news conference Wednesday announcing the case against Trump and his family business, James noted that the law “gives the attorney general broad and special powers.”

“It is a very powerful statute,” said David Nachman, who brought a number of cases that cited the law during his 10 years at the attorney general’s office, including a sprawling suit against the opioid companies. Nachman is now a visiting lecturer at Yale Law School.

The power, he said, stems largely from a relatively low bar to proving fraud. In these cases, the attorney general’s office does not have to show that defendants intended to defraud anyone or that their actions resulted in any financial loss. It can make a case based solely on significant misrepresentations or deceptive practices.

The law also provides for defendants to disgorge their ill-gotten gains, giving the attorney general considerable leverage in potential settlement negotiations before a case goes to trial. The lawsuit against Trump seeks the $250 million that it contends he reaped through his deceptions, and asks a judge to essentially run him out of business in the state.

And the statute affords the attorney general’s office — the only agency empowered to bring cases under the law — substantial authority to investigate companies before suing them. While plaintiffs in a typical civil dispute cannot collect documents or conduct interviews until after filing a lawsuit, “63 12” empowers the attorney general to issue subpoenas, conduct depositions and do other digging upfront, before deciding whether to sue.

With Trump, James questioned him under oath, but he refused to answer her questions, invoking his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination, a fact highlighted in her lawsuit against him.

“The conduct alleged in this case is tailor-made for the statute,” said Harlan Levy, who served as chief deputy attorney general from 2011 to 2015.

Most of those accused under this law choose to settle, but at trial, it has had mixed results in recent years.

In 2019, following years of bitter litigation and a 12-day civil trial, a Manhattan judge ruled in favor of Exxon, finding that the attorney general’s office had failed to prove that the oil giant had committed fraud in the company’s public representations about climate change. The complaint — which the judge called “hyperbolic” in his ruling — was filed in 2018 by James’ predecessor, Barbara D. Underwood.

Exxon in turn sued the state in federal court, in part on the grounds that the investigation was politically motivated. The court tossed out the case, and a higher court dismissed the appeal earlier this year.

Exxon is not unique in leveling claims of political motivations — a common accusation in politically sensitive cases brought by the attorney general’s office, not just those involving “63 12.”

In 2005, then-Attorney General Eliot Spitzer used the law to sue insurance giant American International Group and its leader, Maurice R. Greenberg, who in turn accused Spitzer of leveraging the case to bolster his political career.

Trump had also attacked James’ predecessors when they came after him using “63 12.” In 2013, then-Attorney General Eric Schneiderman filed a lawsuit against Trump University, the for-profit education venture, calling it a yearslong “bait-and-switch” operation. Trump’s legal team called the investigation “politically motivated” and a “tremendous waste of taxpayers’ money.”

After fighting the case for years, Trump resolved the matter in 2016 with a $25 million settlement.

Echoing Trump’s objections, the Trump Organization said in response to James’ case this week that her action was the product of “politics, pure and simple.”

Trump sued James in federal court late last year seeking to block her investigation, citing critical statements she made about the then-president during her first campaign for attorney general.

For her part, James noted at the news conference Wednesday that the courts had rejected Trump’s claims, clearing the way for her lawsuit accusing Trump of lying about the value of his properties to secure favorable loan terms and insurance premiums.

Her lawsuit, she said, “demonstrates that Donald Trump falsely inflated his net worth by billions of dollars to unjustly enrich himself and to cheat the system, thereby cheating all of us.”

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Trump reportedly admitted taking Kim Jong Un letters from White House

4efcdcc544b9a3eb88a3c315bb76d4e0
 
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images North America/TNS
 
Dave Goldiner, New York Daily News
Mon, September 26, 2022 at 1:51 PM
 
 

Former President Donald Trump has reportedly admitted taking his letters with Kim Jong Un and other “tremendous stuff” when he left the White House on Jan. 20, 2021.

Journalist Maggie Haberman revealed that the twice-impeached president took letters from the North Korean dictator when he jetted to Mar-a-Lago, his Palm Beach, Florida, resort, on the day President Joe Biden was inaugurated.

“Most of it is in the archives, but the Kim Jong-un letters … we have incredible things,” he told Haberman, according to an article she penned in The Atlantic promoting her forthcoming book, “Confidence Man: The Making of Donald Trump and the Breaking of America.”

The interview with Trump was conducted before the FBI search of Mar-a-Lago on Aug. 8, which turned up some 10,000 government documents and more than 100 classified documents.

 

Despite improperly making off with the cache of documents, Trump insisted to Haberman that he didn’t really remove anything important.

”Nothing of great urgency, no,” he told Haberman, who usually writes for The New York Times.

Federal prosecutors are investigating possible violations of the Espionage Act, mishandling classified documents and obstruction of justice in the Mar-a-Lago document search.

Although Trump scored a temporary victory by having a special master appointed to review the seized documents, Raymond Dearie, the veteran federal judge appointed as special master, said Trump’s team was trying to “have its cake and eat it” too, and that he was inclined to regard the records the way the government does: classified.

Dearie followed up with his own order, giving the Justice Department until Monday to submit an affidavit asserting that the FBI’s detailed inventory of items taken in the search is accurate. Trump’s team will have until Sept. 30 to identify errors or mistakes in the inventory.

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Rolling Stone

Trump White House Was Texting With Operative About Plot to Seize Voting Machines

 
 
Nikki McCann Ramirez
Mon, September 26, 2022 at 10:30 AM
 
 
Mark-Meadows - Credit: (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP) (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images)
 
Mark-Meadows - Credit: (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP) (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images)

Former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows was kept informed of efforts to seize voting machines and other schemes to overturn the 2020 election by Trump allies in contested states, according to a trove of text messages obtained by CNN.

In a text exchange from Dec. 23, 2020, mere days before a riotous mob attempted to sabotage the Electoral College certification of President Joe Biden’s win, conspiracy theorist and former Army colonel Phil Waldron updated Meadows on his efforts to have voting machines in Maricopa County, Arizona, seized and examined.

Complaining that a judge had dismissed a lawsuit brought by MAGA legislators demanding the machines be turned over, Waldron texted Meadows that the decision removed “our lead domino we were counting on to start the cascade,” of rulings in other states. “Pathetic,” Meadows replied.

Waldron was deeply involved in the scheme to seize voting machines in states with close electoral margins. He allegedly drafted an executive order for the White House instructing the seizure of voting machines but the order never came to fruition, as it was very clearly illegal. Waldron additionally communicated to Meadows that he had allegedly reviewed troves of suspect electoral data constituting what he described as a “southern steal.”

Meadows’ role in efforts to undermine the integrity of the election through his position as chief of staff has been a subject of interest to law enforcement and investigators. It has become increasingly apparent he acted as a liaison between the White House and those pushing fraudulent schemes to undermine the democratic process and preserve Trump’s power.

The House Jan. 6 committee subpoenaed both Meadows and Waldron in their effort to establish the role the Trump administration had in orchestrating the attack on Congress. Materials obtained by the committee from Meadows included a 38-slide PowerPoint created by Waldron proposing various ways to overturn the results of the election.

In an interview with 60 minutes former House member and senior technical adviser to the Jan. 6 committee Denver Riggleman indicated that messages obtained from Meadows by the committee revealed a “roadmap to an attempted coup.” Meadows was also texting with Ginni Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, about overturning the election. Ginni Thomas recently agreed to sit for an interview with the Jan. 6 committee.

In June, former Meadows aide Cassidy Hutchinson testified before the Jan. 6 committee that following a meeting with Rudy Giuliani, Meadows warned her that things might get “real, real bad on Jan. 6.” Hutchinson also relayed to the committee that Meadows burned documents in his office following a meeting with Rep. Scott Perry, who was also embroiled in efforts to overturn election results in Pennsylvania.

As previously reported by Rolling Stone, organizers of the Jan. 6 rallies in Washington, D.C., say they participated in “dozens” of planning meetings with White House staff and members of Trump’s team, including Meadows. “Meadows was 100 percent made aware of what was going on,” says an organizer. “He’s also like a regular figure in these really tiny groups of national organizers.”

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PSSSSSssssssssssst.....

How come we (and those lawyers litigating your Jan 6 FBI riot) are "not allowed" to ask about....

...all those confirmed government actor/agents who controlled the instigation ?

Fear GIFs | Tenor

 

 

PS: Are the courts REALLY that afraid of "the court of public opinion"?...

...or is there some sort of "national secret" involved, in the "operation". 

 

BTW: I thought FBI stood for the bureau of INVESTIGATION...... not the "Bureau of INSTIGATION".

Is that really in their job description ?

🤔

 

 

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40 minutes ago, Troll said:

PSSSSSssssssssssst.....

How come we (and those lawyers litigating your Jan 6 FBI riot) are "not allowed" to ask about....

...all those confirmed government actor/agents who controlled the instigation ?

Fear GIFs | Tenor

 

 

PS: Are the courts REALLY that afraid of "the court of public opinion"?...

...or is there some sort of "national secret" involved, in the "operation". 

 

BTW: I thought FBI stood for the bureau of INVESTIGATION...... not the "Bureau of INSTIGATION".

Is that really in their job description ?

🤔

 

 

You can’t ask questions, just stick to the narrative like a good little sheep. 

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DoJ pushes back on Trump’s claims it planted evidence at Mar-a-Lago

 
 
Gloria Oladipo
Tue, September 27, 2022 at 11:14 AM
 
 
<span>Photograph: Carolyn Kaster/AP</span>
 
Photograph: Carolyn Kaster/AP

The Department of Justice has pushed back on the unsubstantiated claims from Donald Trump that the agency planted evidence during its search of Mar-a-Lago, submitting a slightly amended list of seized materials and an affidavit that the list reflects what was taken during the 8 August search.

The FBI submitted a first version of the inventory list several weeks ago. It only had one business day to compile the first list but had more time to submit the most recent version, reported CNN.

The agency also said that, in the updated version, it filtered out potentially privileged items.

“I am not aware of any documents or materials seized from the Premises on that date by the FBI that are not reflected in the Revised Detailed Property Inventory … other than materials that the Privilege Review Team has not provided to the Case Team,” wrote an FBI agent in the affidavit.

 

The unnamed agent noted that changes between the two versions were “minor”.

Judge Raymond Dearie, the special master appointed to review the documents case, requested that the FBI submit an inventory to provide a “full and accurate” picture of what was obtained in the search.

Dearie’s request came after Trump and several allies claimed, without evidence, that the FBI planted items during its search of the Florida mansion.

Dearie has given Trump’s lawyers until Friday to provide any evidence to back up the accusation that the agency is “incorrectly describing” any materials. “This submission shall be Plaintiff’s final opportunity to raise any factual dispute as to the completeness and accuracy of the Detailed Property Inventory,” Dearie wrote.

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11 minutes ago, DBP66 said:

DoJ pushes back on Trump’s claims it planted evidence at Mar-a-Lago

 
 
Gloria Oladipo
Tue, September 27, 2022 at 11:14 AM
 
 
<span>Photograph: Carolyn Kaster/AP</span>
 
Photograph: Carolyn Kaster/AP

The Department of Justice has pushed back on the unsubstantiated claims from Donald Trump that the agency planted evidence during its search of Mar-a-Lago, submitting a slightly amended list of seized materials and an affidavit that the list reflects what was taken during the 8 August search.

The FBI submitted a first version of the inventory list several weeks ago. It only had one business day to compile the first list but had more time to submit the most recent version, reported CNN.

The agency also said that, in the updated version, it filtered out potentially privileged items.

“I am not aware of any documents or materials seized from the Premises on that date by the FBI that are not reflected in the Revised Detailed Property Inventory … other than materials that the Privilege Review Team has not provided to the Case Team,” wrote an FBI agent in the affidavit.

 

The unnamed agent noted that changes between the two versions were “minor”.

Judge Raymond Dearie, the special master appointed to review the documents case, requested that the FBI submit an inventory to provide a “full and accurate” picture of what was obtained in the search.

Dearie’s request came after Trump and several allies claimed, without evidence, that the FBI planted items during its search of the Florida mansion.

Dearie has given Trump’s lawyers until Friday to provide any evidence to back up the accusation that the agency is “incorrectly describing” any materials. “This submission shall be Plaintiff’s final opportunity to raise any factual dispute as to the completeness and accuracy of the Detailed Property Inventory,” Dearie wrote.

 

They get him for those classified top secret Nuclear Codes that was leaked a couple weeks back?.....

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1 hour ago, Warrior said:

 

They get him for those classified top secret Nuclear Codes that was leaked a couple weeks back?.....

yea they did...he has until Friday to explain to the Judge how the DOJ "planted" evidence in his home as he alleged...Nuclear Codes?...who said that?....you.

the 20 boxes of top secret info. he lied about??...yea..he got caught red-handed...one file was in his desk draw....they did a real good job "planting" the evidence huh??....😉

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Trump’s Truth Social SPAC Changes Address to UPS Store as Investors Pull $137.5 Million

56fa0e97b5320a6073b1a1c1fda04838
 
Eileen AJ Connelly
Tue, September 27, 2022 at 11:03 AM
 
 

Investors have pulled $138.5 million from the blank check company linked to Donald Trump’s Truth Social, and Digital World Acquisition Corp., which was supposed to deliver $1.3 billion to help the former president take on Twitter, has changed its address to a mailbox at a UPS store.

Digital World Acquisition said in a regulatory filing obtained by TheWrap that its address is now 3109 Grand Avenue #450 in Miami. “A search of the address brings up a UPS Store nestled between and Italian restaurant and a nail salon in the waterfront neighborhood of Coconut Grove,” The Financial Times reported.

The change of address came in the same disclosure filed Friday that said investors had been pulling cash from the venture, which has generally disappointed after pulling in far fewer users than hoped.

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2 hours ago, DBP66 said:

yea they did...he has until Friday to explain to the Judge how the DOJ "planted" evidence in his home as he alleged...Nuclear Codes?...who said that?....you.

the 20 boxes of top secret info. he lied about??...yea..he got caught red-handed...one file was in his desk draw....they did a real good job "planting" the evidence huh??....😉

Wow!! This must be it this time…keep me posted when the indictment hits

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